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VIA FRANCIGENA From Siena to Rome on the roads of pilgrims 7 days

francigena-ind
Daily Tour 7 day Availability: 2020-03-01
05018 Orvieto TR, Italia Europe Tour Guide: Emanuele M.

The Via Francigena (Italian: [ˈviːa franˈtʃiːdʒena]) is the common name of an ancient road and pilgrim route running from France to Rome and Apulia, where there were the ports of embarkation for the Holy Land,[1] though it is usually considered to have its starting point on the other side of the English Channel, in the cathedral city of Canterbury. As such, the route passes through England, France, Switzerland and Italy. The route was known in Italy as the “Via Francigena” (“the road that comes from France”) or the “Via Romea Francigena” (“the road to Rome that comes from France”).[2] In medieval times it was an important road and pilgrimage route for those wishing to visit the Holy See and the tombs of the apostles Peter and Paul.

In the Middle Ages, Via Francigena was the major pilgrimage route to Rome from the north. The route was first documented as the “Lombard Way”, and was first called the Iter Francorum (the “Frankish Route”) in the Itinerarium sancti Willibaldi of 725, a record of the travels of Willibald, bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria. It was “Via Francigena-Francisca” in Italy and Burgundy, the “Chemin des Anglois” in the Frankish Kingdom (after the evangelisation of England in 607) and also the “Chemin Romieux”, the road to Rome.[citation needed]The name Via Francigena is first mentioned in the Actum Clusio, a parchment of 876 in the Abbey of San Salvatore at Monte Amiata (Tuscany). At the end of the 10th century Sigeric the Serious, the Archbishop of Canterbury, used the Via Francigena to and from Rome in order to receive his pallium; he recorded his route and his stops on the return journey, but nothing in the document suggests that the route was then new.Later itineraries to Rome include the Leiðarvísir og borgarskipan of the Icelandic traveller Nikolás Bergsson (in 1154) and the one from Philip Augustus of France (in 1191). Two somewhat differing maps of the route appear in manuscripts of Matthew Paris, Historia Anglorum, from the 13th century.

The Via Francigena – in France given the Grande Randonnée route number GR145 – crossing the Massif de Saint Thierry, Champagne.

The Welshman Rhodri Mawr in AD 880 and his grandson Howell the Good in 945 are both known to have visited Rome towards the end of their lives, but it is not known whether they went by land or by the dangerous and pirate-infested sea route via Gibraltar. Reports of journeys before Sigeric can only be apocryphal.[citation needed] We may be quite certain that the Benedictine William of St-Thierry used the roads towards Rome on several occasions at the end of the 11th century. The return journey by sea was likely to be easier, thanks to the prevailing south-westerly winds, but tacking down to the Mediterranean would have made a very long journey indeed. A statement that a historical figure “died in Rome” may have been a historical falsity, but a metaphorical truth.

The Via Francigena was not a single road, like a Roman road, paved with stone blocks and provided at intervals with a change of horses for official travellers. Rather, it comprised several possible routes that changed over the centuries as trade and pilgrimage waxed and waned. Depending on the time of year, the political situation, and the relative popularity of the shrines of the saints situated along the route, travellers may have used any of three or four crossings of the Alps and the Apennines. The Lombards financed the maintenance and security of the section of road through their territories as a trading route to the north from Rome, avoiding enemy-held cities such as Florence. Another important point is that unlike Roman roads, the Via Francigena did not connect cities, but relied more on abbeys

Sigeric’s itinerary

Circa 990 AD, Archbishop Sigeric journeyed from Canterbury to Rome and then back again but only documented his itinerary on the return journey.[7] Sigeric’s return journey consisted of 80 stages averaging about 20 km (12 mi) a day, for a total of some 1,700 km (1,100 mi).[8]

Most modern-day pilgrims would wish to follow Sigeric’s documented route in the reverse order, i.e. from Canterbury to Rome, and so would journey from Canterbury to the English coast before crossing the Channel to Sumeran (now called Sombres) landing at the point where the seaside village of Wissant now lies. From there the modern-day pilgrim must travel to the places Sigeric knew as “Gisne“, “Teranburh“, “Bruaei“, “Atherats“, before continuing on to Reims, Châlons-sur-Marne, Bar-sur-Aube, Langres, Besançon, Pontarlier, Lausanne and Saint-Maurice. From Saint-Maurice they must traverse the Great St. Bernard Pass to Aosta and from Aosta they must pass through Ivrea, Vercelli, Pavia, Fidenza, Pontremoli, Filattiera, Aulla, Luni, Lucca, San Gimignano, Poggibonsi, Siena, San Quirico d’Orcia, Bolsena, Viterbo and Sutri before finally reaching the city of Rome.


DEPARTURE/RETURN LOCATION/ITINERARY

Day 1: Arrival in Siena overnight in 3 star hotel
Day 2: Siena > San Quirico d’Orcia 58 km, elevation gain 850 m | overnight in 3
star hotel with swimming pool
Day 3: San Quirico d’Orcia > Proceno 59 km, elevation gain 1200 m | overnight
in 3 star hotel
Day 4: Proceno > Viterbo 60 km, elevation gain 850 m | overnight in 3 star
hotel
Day 5: Viterbo > Campagnano di Roma 65 km , elevation gain 800 m |
overnight in 3 star hotel
Day 6: Campagnano di Roma > Roma 47 km , elevation gain 450 m | overnight
in 3 star hotel
Day 7: Departure from Roma (Google Map)

 


DEPARTURE/RETURN LOCATION
Day 1: Arrival in Siena overnight in 3 star hotel
Day 2: Siena > San Quirico d’Orcia 58 km, elevation gain 850 m | overnight in 3
star hotel with swimming pool
Day 3: San Quirico d’Orcia > Proceno 59 km, elevation gain 1200 m | overnight
in 3 star hotel
Day 4: Proceno > Viterbo 60 km, elevation gain 850 m | overnight in 3 star
hotel
Day 5: Viterbo > Campagnano di Roma 65 km , elevation gain 800 m |
overnight in 3 star hotel
Day 6: Campagnano di Roma > Roma 47 km , elevation gain 450 m | overnight
in 3 star hotel
Day 7: Departure from Roma (Google Map)

DEPARTURE TIME
In the Morning.

INCLUDED

WHAT IS INCLUDED IN THE PRICE:
– 7 nights in 3 star hotel
– 7 breakfast buffet
– Luggage transfer
– Maps, trip notes and detailed route directions
– Medical and baggage insurance
– Welcome briefing in the day of departure
– Maps, trip notes and detailed route directions
– Medical and baggage insurance

  • Accommodations
  • Professional guide

NOT INCLUDED
  • Airfare
  • SUPPLEMENTS
    Mtb rent: (Mtb 29”; Bike consignment in Siena,specific
    setting and recovery from Roma): + 200€
    Ebike rent: (Ebike mtb 29”; Bike consignment in
    Siena,specific setting and recovery from Roma): + 300€
    – single room: + 115,00 €
    – half-breakfast: + 145,00 € (drinks not included)
    extra night in Siena: 50,00 € (per person in double or
    twin room) / 75,00 € (per person in single room)
    extra night in Roma: 80,00 € (per person in double or
    twin room) / 95,00 € (per person in single room)

 

What to Expect

SELF GUIDED TOUR - CODE: En09
PERIOD 7 days / 6 nights
DATES every day from March to November
BIKE Mountain bike
TERRAIN Dirt roads alternating with paved roads
DIFFICULTY 4 on a scale of 5

From Siena to Rome, from Piazza del Campo to Piazza San Pietro by bicycle, following one of the o the
most fascinating and famous pilgrimage routes in Italy. The tour we propose faithfully follows the original
route of the Via Francigena, across the Tuscan hinterland and Lazio. The route develops most of all on
dirt roads through the areas of the Val d’Orcia, the town of Radicofani, Viterbo called “the city of the
Popes”, the beautiful Bolsena lake and the area of Tuscia, until arriving in the center of the capital.

Minimu of participants 2

Starting point of the tour at the hotel in Siena.
For those arriving by car it is possible to leave the car at the underground car park of the Siena train station at a cost of € 2.00 per day. The hotel is easily reachable on foot from the train station.
Who the tour is aimed at

The route runs for many kilometers on dirt roads. The length of the stages and the challenging gradients require good cycling training and, although there are no technical steps, it is advisable to practice some riding in the mtb.
With which bike to take the route

Total length: 300 km
The route follows almost entirely the ancient path of the Via Francigena and develops on mixed ground: some sections will be on asphalt, many on dirt roads and in some cases you will have to push the bicycle by hand.

 

Day 1:Individual arrival in Siena

Individual arrival in Siena and overnight stay in a 3-star hotel on the outskirts of the city.

Day 2: Siena > San Quirico d’Orcia 58 km, elevation gain 850 m |

overnight in 3 star hotel with swimming pool

The first leg of the tour crosses the Arbia valley and arrives in Val d’Orcia where you will stay in the city of San Quirico d’Orcia. To note along the way the Grancia di Cuna, an illustrious architectural example of a fortified farm built in the 14th century and the beautiful medieval village of Buonconvento. Overnight in 3-star hotel with swimming pool 2 steps from the historic center.

Day 3: San Quirico d’Orcia > Proceno 59 km, elevation gain 1200 m |

overnight in 3 star hotel 

The second leg of the tour, which from San Quirico will take you to the village of Proceno, is one of the most beautiful and interesting of the entire holiday. The route includes crossing the Val d’Orcia and the descent into the Paglia valley, following long stretches of the old Cassia, unpaved and traffic-free, in a landscape that becomes increasingly wild and lonely. Along the way you will meet the thermal village of Bagno Vignoni and Radicofani, a splendid hilltop village which overlooks the whole Val d’Orcia. Overnight stay in an old house in the center of Proceno.

Day 4: Proceno > Viterbo 60 km, elevation gain 850 m |

overnight in 3 star hotel |

The third stage of the tour will take you to the beautiful and famous city of Viterbo. Also this stage develops for long stretches on dirt roads and with little traffic. There is no lack of interesting points of interest, on all the crossing of the Volsini mountains, the passage from the splendid Lake Bolsena and the Baths of Bagnaccio, a few kilometers from Viterbo, with 5 hyper-thermal pools at 65 degrees. Overnight in the center of Viterbo in a 4-star hotel.

Day 5: Campagnano di Roma 65 km , elevation gain 800 m |

The fourth stage of the tour will take you to Campagnano di Roma. Leaving Viterbo, you will immediately walk along a spectacular Etruscan road, entirely excavated in the tuff. The capital is approaching and the countries that we cross carry all the signs of the temporal power of the popes: baroque palaces and fountains overlook scenic squares in Vetralla, Capranica and Sutri, but the memories of classical, Etruscan and Roman antiquity emerge at every street corner. Just outside Sutri you will meet the Urban Park of the ancient city of Sutri where you can visit the beautiful amphitheater. You will continue on a wonderful road that will take you first to the Monte Gelato waterfalls and then to Campagnano where you will stay in a 3-star hotel.

Day 6:Campagnano di Roma > Roma 47 km , elevation gain 450 m |

overnight in 3 star hotel 

The fifth and final stage of the tour will complete the “pilgrimage” reaching Piazza San Pietro. The original route of the Via Francigena plans to follow the very busy Via Cassia and then the Via Trionfale to reach Monte Mario and then San Pietro. The intense traffic and the dangerousness of this road has led us to study and offer you an alternative: a beautiful cycling route that crosses the natural park of Veio and reaches the center of Rome on the Tiber cycle path. This territory is a true naturalistic island on the outskirts of Rome. Overnight in a 3-star hotel near Piazza San Pietro.

Day 7: Departure from Roma to the Airport 

After breakfast, end of services and departure.

Starting point of the tour at the hotel in Siena.
For those arriving by car it is possible to leave the car at the underground car park of the Siena train station at a cost of € 2.00 per day. The hotel is easily reachable on foot from the train station.
Who the tour is aimed at

The route runs for many kilometers on dirt roads. The length of the stages and the challenging gradients require good cycling training and, although there are no technical steps, it is advisable to practice some riding in the mtb.
With which bike to take the route

The Via Francigena is such a beautiful route that anyone who loves cycling or walking should do it at least once in their life. In so many years that we travel around Italy by bicycle we have never tried the emotions that this journey, so full of history and stories, has given us. The Basilica of San Pietro which opens before us after days of travel on ancient Roman paving stones, pristine forests and medieval villages is an experience that moves us every time. In recent years we have traveled the whole itinerary countless times, concentrating on the Tuscan and Lazio territory, creating an offer that will allow everyone, MTB, trekking and racing bike lovers, to walk the roads of the ancient pilgrims.

1 Review

  1. John Doe
    06:59 - 4 Luglio 2017 / Reply

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